Success in Graduate School and After: Survey Results from the Midwest Region, Part III

PS: Political Science and Politics

Author/s (editor/s):

Vicki L. Hesli, Jacqueline DeLaat, Jeremy Youde, Jeanette Mendez, Sang-shin Lee

Publication year:

2006

Publication type:

Journal article

Find this publication at:
Cambridge Journals

Vicki L. Hesli, Jacqueline DeLaat, Jeremy Youde, Jeanette Mendez, and Sang-shin Lee, ‘Success in Graduate School and After: Survey Results from the Midwest Region, Part III’, PS: Political Science and Politics, 39(2) 2006: 317‒25.

PhD-granting institutions want students to complete their doctoral degrees. Most graduate departments in political science focus their training on preparing students to pursue academic careers. We provide valid and reliable empirical data about the factors that affect students’ prospects for successfully completing political science doctoral degrees and finding academic jobs. Because National Science Foundation data (2002, Table 53) reveal significant differences in the number of doctoral degrees awarded to women compared with men, we test a series of hypotheses based on the existing literature that may account for these differences. Our paper applies knowledge gained from previous studies, such as in the area of mentoring (Wasby 2001; Andersen 2001; Benesh 2001), to explain observed gender differences in doctoral degree completion and success in gaining academic employment thereafter.

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