Understanding the Myanmar National Human Rights Commission (MNHRC) in the Context of Transition

Understanding the Myanmar National Human Rights Commission (MNHRC) in the Context of Transition

Event details

Myanmar Brownbag Seminar Series

Date & time

Tuesday 03 November 2015
12.30pm–2pm

Venue

SDSC Reading Room, Hedley Bull Centre (130), corner of Garran Road and Liversidge Street, ANU
ANU Canberra

Speaker

Jonathan Liljeblad

Contacts

Chit Win

During the 28th Session of the Human Rights Council in March 2015, Myanmar’s Deputy Foreign Minister U Thyant Kyaw declared “In order to be more compliant with the Paris Principles, the Myanmar National Human Rights Commission Law was enacted by the Parliament on 28 March 2014." The Myanmar National Human Rights Commission Law sought to address critiques that had been levelled at the previous incarnation of the MNHRC. Despite these improvements, the MNHRC continued to be criticized for a perceived lack of effectiveness. This paper argues that an evaluation of the MNHRC against such critiques needs to be placed within a larger context of Myanmar’s ongoing transition, and that doing so indicates that the MNHRC’s apparent measured progress reflects an incrementalist strategy that is appropriate for the challenges facing it.

Jonathan Liljeblad lectures at the University of New England School of Law. He holds a PhD and JD, both from the University of Southern California. His research interests are in environmental and human rights issues. This work is based on research conducted under a US Fulbright Scholar grant to Myanmar for 2014–2015. He was born in Taunggyi, Shan State, Myanmar, but was raised in Sweden and the United States.

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