November 2020

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02
Nov
2020

What's so special about Asian security? Dealing with economics and institutions.

Professor Alice D. Ba, Associate Professor Elizabeth Thurbon, Professor Natasha Hamilton-Hart
Are the security landscape and dynamics in Asia significantly different compared to those in other world regions? Is there anything ‘special’ about Asian security that necessitates alterations or additions to the theories, concepts or methods of standard international relations or security studies...

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A 15th-century reconstruction based on Ptolemy's projections of the world (Wikimedia Commons)
02
Nov
2020

Liberal states, social bordering, and international order

Chris Reus-Smit, Professor of International Relations at the University of Queensland
A vigorous debate is underway about the future of the liberal international order, but contributions to this debate commonly discount the order’s pre-1945 origins, ignore fundamental shifts in its organising principle (from empire to sovereignty), and while privileging the agency of liberal states...

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16
Nov
2020

Understanding the Abrams Doctrine and post-Vietnam U.S. force structure policy

James Blackwell
In the immediate period surrounding the end of the United States’ involvement in Vietnam, the U.S. Army undertook a fundamental restructure of their active and reserve forces, linking them together under the Total Force Policy in such a way as to be inseparable in mobilisation. The prevailing...

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25
Nov
2020

Sexual violence in armed conflict: Paths to recovery

Professor Bina D'Costa, Associate Professor Kirsten Ainley, May Maloney, Rebecca Piam
Sexual violence is often the ‘silent crime’ of armed conflicts, leaving largely invisible scars that too often go unnoticed. For practitioners and researchers alike, how we talk and think about sexual violence has real-world consequences for the recovery of people affected by it. To commemorate...

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30
Nov
2020

Empire’s labor: The global army that supports US wars

Associate Professor Adam Moore
Since 9/11 the US has become dependent on a vast army of foreign, contracted labor to fight its wars—to a degree unprecedented in the country’s history. In this talk, Adam Moore details the scale and scope of this development, as well as the resulting effects. Military contracting, he argues, is...

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