Greg Raymond

Naval Modernization in Southeast Asia: Under the Shadow of Army Dominance? - Contemporary Southeast Asia Vol. 39, No. 1 (2017)

Using a historical institutionalist approach, this article addresses the future of Southeast Asia’s naval forces. Much analysis on this subject

Australia must be dexterous in its ties with Trump's America

Australia must deal now with an inexperienced American leadership inclined to reject expertise. Intelligence chiefs have been removed from the most important decision-making apparatus, the National Security Council, and replaced with ideologues. The potential for grave errors of judgment appears greater than in years.

Risk and imagination in the Trump era

Although the Australia-US alliance is a relationship of longstanding mutual benefit, Canberra now needs to take very seriously the possibility of its ally devising plans that are not well matched to the risks the nation now faces, Greg Raymond writes.

Afraid new world

The election of President Trump brings more uncertainty than direction. His election campaign was in broad strokes, and his radical propositions may yet prove to be merely opening gambits for negotiations. Where foreign policy was concerned, the Middle East received far more attention than Asia.

What’s wrong with the United States’ Southeast Asian allies?

What’s wrong with the United States’ Southeast Asian allies?

The Passing of the King

Dr Greg Raymond discusses the potential political, strategic and economic consequences of the death of Thailand's King, His Majesty King Bhumibol Adulyadej.

South China Sea ruling a test for our patchwork global order

The arbitral tribunal convened under Part XV of the United Nations Law of the Sea Convention has found that China's claimed historic rights in the South China Sea, enshrined in its nine-dash line map, were extinguished when it signed the convention.

The South China Sea: next stop the UN Security Council?

All the signs indicate that China is preparing to reject the anticipated adverse judgment of the Permanent Court of Arbitration on the South China Sea. The Philippines is arguing that China is acting illegally in exploiting resources in the areas beyond the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) limits while forcibly preventing other nearby states like the Philippines from exploiting the resources in the same areas

Playing by the global rules

Australia's 2016 Defence white paper uses the term "rules-based global order" 56 times, compared with just nine instances in its 2013 predecessor.

Facing reality in the South China Sea

The news that China has placed surface-to-air missiles on Woody Island, part of the disputed Paracel Islands group in the South China Sea, will surprise many observers.

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