international relations

2017- A Year in Review: Coral Bell School of Asia Pacific Affairs

The aspirations and approach of Bell School show a strong focus on research excellence, collegiality, award-winning teaching, and consistent policy impact and engagement in the Asia-Pacific.

Performing Unity: The symbol and ritual of ASEAN

In his latest book project, Mathew Davies argues that, at its core, the Association of Southeast Asian Nations is really just one big performance.

Comic Relief: Unpacking the politics of pop culture

In his newly designed course for international relations students, Alister Wedderburn is bringing culture back to the fore.

Being a good neighbour: Australia in Asia

Australia 360: A panel of academics from the SDSC discuss Australia’s relationships with its neighbours.

Regional roundup spotlights Australia’s key relationships

Speaking at the Australian National University’s annual Australia 360 event last Tuesday, a panel of academics broke down Australia’s key regional relationships, starting in Southeast Asia.

Politics and International Studies at ANU jumps to 6th place in 2017 QS Rankings

The 2017 QS World University Rankings has seen Politics and International Studies at ANU move from 8th place in the world to 6th place. It is the third year in a row that ANU has been ranked among the top ten for these subjects.

Coral Bell School at ANU Open Day 2019

On Saturday, 31 August, 9am - 4pm The Australian National University will open its doors to everyone and anyone interested in studying at Australia’s top-ranked university.

Program convenors, academics, current students and staff from the Coral Bell School of Asia Pacific Affairs will be available to speak to you about all of our programs (undergraduate and postgraduate) and will be offering the following information sessions on the day:

The wall that moves: The separation barrier in the West Bank

In this seminar, Dr Umut Ozguc explores the ways in which the separation wall operates as a complex network that brings together diverse social, political and spatial elements in novel ways. The wall generates new connections, codes, and discontinuities in the West Bank. It creates its own fixed and fluid elements, statements, and functions. The wall first empties Palestinian land to occupy it. It then captures that land, its people and resources, and imposes its own behavioral, legal, and institutional codes. These codes are made up of ever-shifting heterogeneous elements.

Pages

Updated:  22 March 2016/Responsible Officer:  Bell School Marketing Team/Page Contact:  CAP Web Team