international relations

Testing the Nuclear Stability-Instability Paradox Using Synthetic Control Method

Does acquisition of nuclear weapons by security rivals increase their level of conventional militarised conflict? Some recent theoretical and quantitative work has supported the ‘stability-instability paradox’, the proposition that while nuclear weapons deter nuclear war, they may also provide the conditions for nuclear-armed rivals to increase conventional military conflict with each other. However, other quantitative analysis and qualitative studies of the India–Pakistan dyad have delivered more equivocal assessments.

Chinese Power and the Idea of a Responsible State in a Changing World Order

In this Centre of Gravity paper, Professor Emeritus Rosemary Foot, Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Politics and International Relations at the University of Oxford, outlines the evoluti

Making the Invisible Visible: The Practice of Film Production as International Relations

How to make the invisible visible in a way that recognises the agency of the invisible is a question pertinent to feminist and decolonial method in International Relations (IR). In this seminar, Sophie Harman explores a new method of research to explore this question: the co-production of a narrative feature film Pili, between an academic researcher, a film crew, and a group of women from rural coastal Tanzania living below the international poverty line of US$2 a day. This project is the first use of narrative feature film as method in IR.

World Peace (and how we can achieve it)

This talk is an investigation into the idea and the possibility of world peace. It argues that world peace is possible and explores how world politics might be nudged towards greater peacefulness.

What Happens When ISIS Becomes an Online Caliphate?

After the fall of Mosul, devising effective ways to combat Islamic State propaganda will be critically important, writes Dr Haroro Ingram.

Diplomatic Cooperation: An Evolutionary Perspective

Public Lecture co-hosted by the Asia-Pacific College of Diplomacy and the Department of International Relations, Coral Bell School of Asia Pacific Affairs, The Australian National University

Australia needs a diplomatic sea change in the South China Sea

The Australian government needs to show that diplomacy int eh South China Sea has been seriously tried and found wanting. But the evidence is that multilateral diplomacy hasn’t been pursued with the required vigour or intensity.

Ebola 2.0?

Ebola is back, but that doesn’t mean that the world should panic.

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Updated:  22 March 2016/Responsible Officer:  Su-Ann Tan/Page Contact:  CAP Web Team