international relations

Chapter 35 Climate Change: Mainstreaming Gender in the Green Climate Fund

Maria Tanyag, ‘Chapter 35 Climate Change: Mainstreaming Gender in the Green Climate Fund’, in Richard Devetak, Jim George, and Sarah Percy, eds, An Introduction to International Relations,

Global Violence and Security from a Gendered Perspective

Jacqui True and Maria Tanyag, ‘Global Violence and Security from a Gendered Perspective’, in Anthony Burke and Rita Parker, eds, Global Insecurity: Futures of Global Chaos and Governance,

The Globalisation of the Human Security Norm: New Zealand/Aotearoa Leadership and Followership in the World

Jacqui True and Maria Tanyag, ‘The Globalisation of the Human Security Norm: New Zealand/Aotearoa Leadership and Followership in the World’, in Robert Patman, Iati Iati, and Balazs Kiglics, eds,

Violence against Women/Violence in the World: Toward a Feminist Conceptualization of Global Violence

Jacqui True and Maria Tanyag, ‘Violence against Women/Violence in the World: Toward a Feminist Conceptualization of Global Violence’, in Caron Gentry, Laura J.

Feminist Methodologies in International Relations

Maria Tanyag, ‘Feminist Methodologies in International Relations’, in Patrick James, ed., Oxford Bibliographies in International Relations, New York: Oxford University Press, 2018, DOI:10.

The Role of the Arts in Cambodia’s Transitional Justice Process: Repairing the Soul of a Nation

At the end of the Khmer Rouge period (1975-1979), less than ten percent of Cambodia’s artists, dancers, musicians, and film makers remained in Cambodia. Marked as ‘undesirables’, members of the arts community, along with professionals, intellectuals, and educated Cambodians, fared particularly poorly under Pol Pot’s regime. While some fled abroad, most died at home from starvation, disease, or the excesses of forced labour, or were killed by the Khmer Rouge, which sought to ‘smash’ anyone who might pose a challenge to its ideology.

The Meta-Power of Technology: Sarah Logan in Conversation with JP Singh

Sarah Logan, ‘The Meta-Power of Technology: Sarah Logan in Conversation with JP Singh’, in Caroline Kaltofen, Madeline Carr, and Michele Acuto, eds, Technologies of International Relations: Con

‘New Technologies’: Questions of Agency, Responsibility and Luck: Sarah Logan in Conversation with Toni Erskine

Sarah Logan, ‘ “New Technologies”: Questions of Agency, Responsibility and Luck: Sarah Logan in Conversation with Toni Erskine’, in Caroline Kaltofen, Madeline Carr, and Michele Acuto, eds,

Whose Past, Which History? Modern Historiography as a Code

History-writing, this seminar suggests, is not the re-creation of a past that is lying mute, waiting for the historian to give it voice. Historiography is instead a code or genre or technology that constructs the past in ways that make it amenable to representation through the code of history. If history-writing is not the truth of the past, and if other forms of relating to it (myth, epic, legend) are erroneous, we can explore the elements that constitute the code of history, prompting us to ask what history-writing is ‘for’, what does it ‘do’.

From Norm Contestation to Norm Implementation: Recursivity and the Responsibility to Protect

Cecilia Jacob, ‘From Norm Contestation to Norm Implementation: Recursivity and the Responsibility to Protect’, Global Governance, 24(3) 2018: 391-409.

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