populism

'Is Populism “A thing” in the US?' by Professor Christopher Parker

Cecil Gibb Seminar Series 2019

‘Is Populism “A thing” in the US?’

by Professor Christopher Parker, Department of Political Science, University of Washington

Seminar co-sponsored by the Research School of Psychology Cecil Gibb Seminar Series and Coral Bell School Horizons Seminar Series

Populism and the Australian election: what could fringe voters deliver to our parliament?

Populist voters could tip the balance to a Coalition government, writes Paul Kenny in The Guardian.

Australian Foreign Policy in Political Time: Middle Power Creativity, Misplaced Friendships, and Crises of Leadership

Wesley Widmaier, ‘Australian Foreign Policy in Political Time: Middle Power Creativity, Misplaced Friendships, and Crises of Leadership’, Australian Journal of International Affairs, onlin

Environmental Populism: Could It Save the World?

Populism is popular but generally gets a bad press — for good reasons. But could populism actually be a progressive force in domestic and even international politics? Recent movements such as Occupy Wall Street and the abortive Arab Spring suggest it might. This presentation previews my forthcoming book and considers — more in hope than expectation — whether a populist upsurge could actually mobilise around the issue of climate change. We will undoubtedly be forced to respond to climate change eventually, but thoughtful, constructive responses may no longer be possible by the time we do.

Populism and Patronage: Why Populists Win Elections in India, Asia and Beyond

Populist rule is bad for democracy, yet in country after country, populists are being voted into office.

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