Transforming our economies to serve people and the planet is the big challenge of our time. However, there is no alternative, we need to move away from the current unhealthy and unjust economic practices that are harming the Earth’s ecosystems, which include all of us. Taking the lead to drive this necessary change is something that many are doing all around the world. 

On November 8, join the 2023 Fellows of the Future Leaders Program of the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse in an open conversation with external guests to talk about why this economic transformation is so pivotal to achieve Planetary Health Equity and where they see their contribution.  

No matter their area of expertise, from food and urban development to gender and climate, they are all working with the same vision in mind: a healthy planet where all people today and tomorrow can live and thrive. Are you working on a similar path or simply curious to learn more? Would you like to share your point of view and experience or simply just listen? Then join us!

This is an event part of Earth4All Action Week 2023.

Event Speakers

Amy Carrad

Amy Carrad

Amy Carrad is a Research Fellow within the ANU’s School of Regulation and Global Governance. Prior to joining ANU, Amy worked on an Australian Research Council-funded project exploring the role of Australian local governments and civil society organisations in food system governance. She is particularly passionate about food systems, which also leads her advocacy work outside ANU.

Hridesh Gajurel

Hridesh Gajurel

Hridesh is a political economist specialising in comparative capitalism, financialisation, corporate short-termism, and institutional theory. He is currently a Postdoctoral Researcher in public policy based in Nepal and was previously a Lecturer in Political Science and International Relations at the University of Queensland.

Sandra Samantela

Sandra Samantela

Sandra is an environmental planner and assistant professor in the Department of Community and Environmental Resource Planning, University of the Philippines Los Baños where she teaches courses in human settlements/environmental planning and human ecology. Her research interests include climate and disaster vulnerability, urban land governance, and local development planning.

 

Steven Lade

Steven Lade

Dr Steven Lade is an ARC Future Fellow at the Fenner School of Environment & Society. He takes a systems approach to sustainability, working with the resilience and planetary boundary concepts across a variety of cases.

Betty Barkha

Betty Barkha

Dr Betty Barkha brings over a decade of experience in research, advocacy and business development across the Pacific and Asia. Betty's PhD focused on examining the Gendered impacts of Climate Change-Induced Displacement and Planned Relocation in Fiji, which has since informed the development of Pacific Regional Framework on Climate Mobility.

A series of webinars created by the Hothouse at ANU, discussing the intersections between climate change, inequity, and human health. The focus is on actions that enable transformative change away from the harmful consumptogenic system to systems that promote good health, social equity and environmental wellbeing.

This episode featured Dr Annabelle Workman, Research Fellow at Melbourne Climate Futures.

The health and other impacts of climate change highlight an imperative for urgent climate action. The health community continues to increase its efforts in raising the alarm on climate-related health impacts and emphasising the health and economic benefits of ambitious and timely action. Yet, projections based on the analysis of current policies and action see us remain on a dangerous path of global warming over 2°C. Using insights from the political economy literature, this seminar will explore what strategies might exist to secure the urgent action needed to develop healthier climate policies.

Event Speakers

Photo of Annabelle, smiling.

Annabelle Workman

Belle is a social scientist driven by the urgent need to develop healthier climate policies. With a background in political science and public health, Belle is now a Research Fellow at Melbourne Climate Futures, co-leading the Health, Wellbeing and Climate Justice Research Program with Professor Kathryn Bowen.

Meg Arthur smiling in front of plants

Megan Arthur

Megan is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse. She is an interdisciplinary qualitative researcher working at the intersection of social policy and public health. She studies the politics of governance for health and wellbeing at multiple levels, with a particular interest in the social and environmental determinants of health equity.

Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow and Professor of Health Equity.

A series of webinars created by the Hothouse at ANU, discussing the intersections between climate change, inequity, and human health. The focus is on actions that enable transformative change away from the harmful consumptogenic system to systems that promote good health, social equity and environmental wellbeing.

This episode will feature Beck Pearse, a sociologist at the ANU School of Sociology and the Fenner School of Environment & Society.

Beck will discuss the social realities of Australia’s energy workforce and the resultant difficult questions about the political economy and geography of ‘just transition’ advocacy. Answers to questions about the where and who of transition management will be negotiated at multiple scales. The presentation will conclude with provisional thoughts on the institutions and reform strategies that will shape the future conditions, and therefore health, of energy labour.

Beck Pearse is a Lecturer jointly appointed to the ANU School of Sociology and Fenner School of Environment and Society. Beck’s current research projects investigate labour and land relations in the transition to a 'net zero' economy. She's interested in how people work and negotiate industrial change. Beck's doctoral thesis on the political economy of Australia’s emissions trading scheme was published as a monograph Pricing Carbon in Australia (Routledge/Earthscan, 2018). More recently, she co-authored Renewables and Rural Australia (2022) - the first social study of rural people's perspectives on the NSW Renewable Energy Zones.

Event Speakers

Photo of Rebecca Pearse

Beck Pearse

Beck Pearse is a sociologist at the ANU School of Sociology and the Fenner School of Environment & Society. Her teaching and research focuses on inequalities and environmental policy. Beck is interested in how people from different walks of life experience environmental change and how environmental policy can contribute to building a fair and ecologically abundant world.

Meg Arthur smiling in front of plants

Megan Arthur

Megan is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse. She is an interdisciplinary qualitative researcher working at the intersection of social policy and public health. She studies the politics of governance for health and wellbeing at multiple levels.

Sharon Friel

Sharon Friel

Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow, Professor of Health Equity and Director of the Menzies Centre for Health Governance at the School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet), Australian National University. She is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences Australia and co-Director of the NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in the Social Determinants of Health Equity.

Please join PhD candidate Lauren Bland as she provides an update during her research journey.

Lauren's research delves into the evolving dynamics of partnerships for climate crisis resilience building in the Pacific region, with a specific focus on Aotearoa and its engagement with Pacific nations. Through critical analysis, it will aim to uncover the benefits and challenges of the Aotearoa-Pacific partnership and shed light on its impact on the Pacific’s capacity to build resilience against climate-related challenges. Central to this, is the examination of resilience discourse in climate and development policy frameworks, addressing the complexities and critiques surrounding this concept in a pluralist social landscape. This research is grounded in qualitative methods and seeks to contribute to a deeper understanding of building valuable partnerships for climate crisis resilience. It aims to provide policy recommendations for meaningful collaboration in the Pacific region, with a strong emphasis on climate justice and more profound Pacific engagement by Aotearoa. 

Event Speakers

Lauren Bland

Lauren Bland

Originally from Ngunnawal (Canberra) having moved to Aotearoa in 2014, Lauren Bland is a PhD candidate from the University of Canterbury based in Ōtautahi (Christchurch). She holds a BA in political science and media and communications and an MA focused on democracy and human rights development in Cambodia.

Pacific states and peoples inside global climate change negotiations (UNFCCC COP): from consensus, coherence to ‘climate updated’

For more than 35 years Pacific islands’ states and peoples have led and shaped the global agenda in global climate change negotiations. This seminar will detail the multi-year research that traces, follows and works with Pacific states and peoples inside the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) annual Conference of the Parties. In utilising Global Talanoa (global political ethnography and talanoa) the research gives access inside the negotiations where the project has studied and provided research brokerage for leaders, state delegates and civil society in the negotiations over the years. Situated at the intersection and interplay of international politics and climate change, it follows the work of Pacific states from the Paris COP21 in 2015, to the recent Sharm El Sheik COP27 in 2022 – how they have held space in shaping and influencing the negotiations agenda. The ‘Pacific society’ of officials, diplomats, civil society, activists and leaders have not only help build, but also reach consensus on climate action. Moreover, the research explores the coherence of various regional mechanisms, political processes and coalitions Pacific states have established over the years to manage the negotiations. Through research brokerage and ‘climate updated’ the presentation provides insights to the future of negotiations – and the case for the Australia and Pacific Islands climate change COP.

NOTE: this is a hybrid seminar. For online attendance please sign up to receive the Zoom link.

The recording of the seminar is available below:

Event Speakers

George Carter is a Research Fellow in Geopolitics and Regionalism, at the Department of Pacific Affairs at The Australian National University (ANU).

PLEASE NOTE: This is a hybrid event and will take place in-person as well as on Zoom.

Small island developing states (SIDS) recognise climate change as the single greatest threat to their development, sustainability, and security. They illustrate how climate-induced events such as sea level rise and severe weather events threaten the everyday lives of people across the world. While the security communities prioritise traditional threats and geopolitical rivalry, communities in island nations are concerned about an ongoing existential threat and its impact on their potential for development.

Please join PhD candidate Athaulla (‘Atho’) Rasheed as he presents an update on his research. Using the cases of Maldives and Samoa, Athaulla aims to show how SIDS have navigated their security interests in terms of climate security. This presentation will discuss some aspects of climate security in Maldives. It will provide a pathway to the analysis of Samoa and the final empirical findings of the PhD research.

Event Speakers

Athaulla Rasheed

Athaulla Rasheed

Athaulla is a PhD candidate at DPA, focusing on international relations, particularly on small island developing states (SIDS), climate change and international politics and security. He developed a constructivist research agenda for understanding the role of SIDS in UN climate negotiations. His current research looks at international politics and construction of climate security in SIDS.

Please join PhD candidate Geejay Milli as she provides an update during her research journey.

Please note that this is a hybrid event. For online attendance please sign up to obtain the Zoom link. Access link will be delivered via email one day prior to the event.

Women’s political representation in the Pacific has garnered much interest from researchers, international non-governmental and governmental organisations and civil society groups due to the low rates of female representation in national and sub-national politics. This seminar will introduce proposed research that will explore this issue in depth with a focus on Papua New Guinea. To better understand how women participate in political processes, this research will investigate two case studies, which include the Autonomous Region of Bougainville and the Motu Koita Assembly.

A parliament with low gender representation does not necessarily mean women are not active participants in politics. Often, a concentrated and sometimes biased focus is given to women’s political representation in parliaments, hence deeming as insignificant other important ways women participate in politics. The participation of women in politics is not one dimensional, rather the researcher argues that relegating women’s politicking and participation to ‘women only issues’ presents a restrictive view of the many other ways women are essential, valuable and influential in their immediate communities. Women are concerned with far more issues than just issues that impact gender.

Geejay Milli is a PhD student at the Department of Pacific Affairs from Papua New Guinea. Her research looks at the case studies of Bougainville and the Motu Koita Assembly with a focus on the participation of women in the political process. Her research area of interests includes politics and elections in Papua New Guinea, women's political participation and representation and the implementation of gender quotas in the Pacific. Prior to her studies, Geejay was teaching at the University of Papua New Guinea with the Political Science Department.

Event Speakers

Geejay Milli
PhD Scholar

Geejay Milli is a PhD student at the Department of Pacific Affairs from Papua New Guinea.