A series of webinars created by the Hothouse at ANU, discussing the intersections between climate change, inequity, and human health. The focus is on actions that enable transformative change away from the harmful consumptogenic system to systems that promote good health, social equity and environmental wellbeing.

This episode featured Dr Annabelle Workman, Research Fellow at Melbourne Climate Futures.

The health and other impacts of climate change highlight an imperative for urgent climate action. The health community continues to increase its efforts in raising the alarm on climate-related health impacts and emphasising the health and economic benefits of ambitious and timely action. Yet, projections based on the analysis of current policies and action see us remain on a dangerous path of global warming over 2°C. Using insights from the political economy literature, this seminar will explore what strategies might exist to secure the urgent action needed to develop healthier climate policies.

Event Speakers

Photo of Annabelle, smiling.

Annabelle Workman

Belle is a social scientist driven by the urgent need to develop healthier climate policies. With a background in political science and public health, Belle is now a Research Fellow at Melbourne Climate Futures, co-leading the Health, Wellbeing and Climate Justice Research Program with Professor Kathryn Bowen.

Meg Arthur smiling in front of plants

Megan Arthur

Megan is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse. She is an interdisciplinary qualitative researcher working at the intersection of social policy and public health. She studies the politics of governance for health and wellbeing at multiple levels, with a particular interest in the social and environmental determinants of health equity.

Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow and Professor of Health Equity.

You are warmly invited to the launch of Defence Industry in 'National Defence': Rethinking the Future of Australian Defence Industry Policy.

You are warmly invited to the launch of

Defence Industry in 'National Defence': Rethinking the Future of Australian Defence Industry Policy

Building the Australian defence industry is critical for our national security in a geopolitically contested era. But our current paradigm for defence industry was built in a different era, and needs to be updated to reflect our contemporary environment.

This report examines how Australia should reframe defence industry policy by drawing lessons from five peer countries: Sweden, France, the UK, Israel and Canada.

While facing different strategic circumstances, their experiences illustrate how the possession of an independent but internationally linked defence industry is itself an asset during a period where the risk of major conflict is rising.

Their experiences offer pertinent lessons for Australia. This report identifies several factors that shape effective policy, argues that a fundamental rethink of Australian defence policy is required, and offers five recommendations.
 

SPEAKERS:

  • Innes Willox, CEO, Australian Industry Group
  • Professor Brian Schmidt, Vice-Chancellor, ANU
  • Kate Louis, Executive Director, Defence Council, Australian Industry Group
  • Professor Stephan Frühling, Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, ANU
  • Chaired by Professor Helen Sullivan, Dean, ANU College of Asia & the Pacific.

 

DETAILS:

  • DATE: Monday 18 Dec 2023 
  • TIME: 10 - 11am
  • VENUE: Cinema, Kambri Cultural Centre, The Australian National University, 153 Tangney Rd, Acton, ACT 2601.

The launch will be followed by morning tea.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND: Scholars, graduate students, policymakers and practitioners working in the fields of Defence and Strategic Studies.

SHARE: You are very welcome to share this invitation with your colleagues and networks in industry government, the APS and academia.

 

REGISTER: Please register your attendance here, no later than Wednesday 13 December 2023.

 

This event is cohosted by the Australian Industry Group (AIG) and the Strategic and Defence Studies Centre (SDSC) in the Coral Bell School of Asia Pacific Affairs at ANU.

Image: HMAS Arunta and Naval Ship Management personnel on board the ship during its docking scheduled refit at Garden Island Defence Precinct, Sydney. Credit: Defence Imagery, LSIS Susan Mossop.

Event Speakers

Innes Willox, CEO, Australian Industry Group

Innes Willox

CEO, AIG
He joined AIG in ‘08 as Director of Government Affairs and became CEO in '18. He has served as Australian Consul General to Los Angeles and was Chief of Staff to the Minister for Foreign Affairs  Alexander Downer. Previously a journalist at The Age as Chief of Staff (Melb) & Chief Political Correspondent (CBR).

Professor Brian P. Schmidt

Professor Brian P. Schmidt, AC FAA FRS

Vice-Chancellor, ANU
Brian Schmidt is one of Australia's most eminent scientists. Winner of the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics, he spent most of his academic career as an astrophysicist before becoming VC. He makes a significant contribution to public debate via media, and through bodies incl. the PM’s National Science & Technology Council.

Kate Louis, AIG

Kate Louis

Executive Director, Ai Group Defence Council
Kate joined AIG in 2017 following an extensive career in the Department of Defence gaining experience in Defence capability development, acquisition, contestability and industry policy, finishing as First Assistant Secretary of the Defence Industry Policy Division.

Stephan Frühling
Professor

Professor Stephan Frühling teaches and researches at the Strategic and Defence Studies Centre of The Australian National University and has widely published on Australian defence policy, defence pl

Helen Sullivan is a public policy researcher, teacher, advisor, and senior university leader.

PLEASE NOTE: This is a hybrid event and will take place in-person as well as on Zoom.

The idea of ownership was put at the heart of the Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness, the key policy for global aid reform, in 2005. Despite the global consensus in Paris, ownership emerged as a contested idea.

In this final seminar for her doctoral thesis, Suzanne O’Neill presents her research which examines the influence of the idea of ownership on development partnerships in two Pacific countries, Samoa and Kiribati. Her research unpacks the model for policy change underpinning the idea of ownership in the Paris Declaration. The findings show that local policy actors attributed a different significance to ownership. Instead, policy actors chose to assert locally-situated values and beliefs around aid and development. This reflected the exercise of ownership in each site in ways that contested the policy logic claimed by the Paris Declaration. It challenged Australia’s expectations of aid relations.

Event Speakers

Suzanne O’Neill

Suzanne O’Neill

Suzanne O’Neill is a PhD Candidate with DPA. She has extensive experience as a development practitioner across remote Australia and the Pacific. Her research interests are equity in development, the influence of ideas on policy change and interpretive methodologies, particularly oral histories.

Episode 12 features Naomi Hogan, the Company Strategy Lead at ACCR, discussing how to influence fossil fuel companies. Naomi has experience in research, campaigns and advocacy, particularly on the impacts of coal and gas projects. Over the past 15 years, Naomi has worked with investors, companies, regional communities, Traditional Owners, scientists and policy makers towards enhanced climate disclosures and environmental protections.

The Saving the World Webinar Series is presented by the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse, the series discusses the intersections between climate change, inequity, and human health. The focus is on actions that enable transformative change away from the harmful consumptogenic system to systems that promote good health, social equity and environmental wellbeing.

Event Speakers

Naomi Hogan

Naomi Hogan

Naomi is the Company Strategy Lead at ACCR, bringing experience in research, campaigns and advocacy, particularly on the impacts of coal and gas projects. Naomi trained in science communication, climate science and natural resource management at the Australian National University. 

Sharon Friel

Sharon Friel

Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow, Professor of Health Equity and Director of the Menzies Centre for Health Governance at the School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet), Australian National University. She is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences Australia and co-Director of the NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in the Social Determinants of Health Equity.

Megan Arthur

Megan Arthur

Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow, Professor of Health Equity and Director of the Menzies Centre for Health Governance at the School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet), Australian National University. She is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences Australia and co-Director of the NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in the Social Determinants of Health Equity.

This seminar will discuss Bougainville's delayed post-referendum process, ABG's push for independence, consultations & disagreements.

PLEASE NOTE: This is a hybrid event and will take place in-person as well as on Zoom. 

The referendum for Bougainvilleans on Bougainville’s future political status, 23 November to 11 December, saw 97.7 per cent vote for independence and 1.7 per cent for ‘greater autonomy’. The referendum result was not binding on PNG, but neither was the referendum purely advisory or consultative for PNG. Instead, the Bougainville Peace Agreement (BPA) and PNG Constitution mandate a three-stage post-referendum decision making process in relation to the results - mandatory consultation between PNG and the Autonomous Bougainville Government (ABG), then decision-making by the PNG Parliament, with the possibility also arising of any ‘differences’ about the referendum being referred to a three stage inter-government dispute resolution process. Unlike the BPA provisions on weapons disposal, autonomy, and actual conduct of the referendum, the BPA contains no provision on either incentives for implementing the post-referendum decision-making arrangements, or a time-table within which they should operate. Despite general agreement before the referendum that post-referendum consultations should begin very soon after the referendum, they in fact did not start for 18 months, in May 2021. Despite hopes of ABG Leaders being raised in the first two consultation meetings that PNG was close to agreeing the ABG demand for early recognition of Bougainville independence, by the third meeting, in December 2021, it was clear agreement was not close, and the ABG declared the consultations over. The focus of effort then shifted to discussion of how a decision would be reached on the referendum results, and officials negotiated the terms of an agreement signed by the leadership in April 2022 – the Era Kone Covenant – which envisaged the two governments agreeing on how the results would be tabled in the PNG Parliament and a decision made on the results. Over a year later, with no agreement reached on those matters, the PNG Minister for Bougainville Affairs made a statement to the Parliament on 13 June 2023, on the next steps, which should see the results tabled later in 2023, and after a Parliamentary Committee conducts a nation-wide ‘awareness and consultation’ process, debate and a decision by Parliament would be possible in 2024. The ABG has made strong criticisms of aspects of the minister’s proposals.

This seminar will discuss: why the post-referendum decision-making process began so long after the referendum: the ABG position on independence advanced in the consultations; why the ABG is seeking PNG agreement to Bougainville independence; why the consultation meetings ended in December 2021; the basis for disagreements over the process since then; issues involved in both tabling of the referendum results in, and decision-making about the results, by the Parliament; why a decision of Parliament on independence for Bougainville can be expected in 2024.

Event Speakers

Anthony Regan

Professor Anthony Regan

Anthony is a constitutional lawyer who specialises in constitutional development and conflict resolution. He has been an adviser to Bougainville parties in the Bougainville peace process since 1994, and has been involved in the Solomon Islands and Sri Lanka peace processes, and the constitution-making process in Timor Leste.